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FSAI Issues 13 Enforcement Orders In September

Published on Oct 7 2016 10:39 AM in Restaurant tagged: Featured Post / Starbucks / FSAI / Waterford / Enforcement Orders / Closure Orders / Food Safety Authority of Ireland

FSAI Issues 13 Enforcement Orders In September

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) served a total of 13 Enforcement Orders in September.

Six Closure Orders were served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

- Starbucks (restaurant/café), 21 Great Georges Street, Waterford
- Ruby King (restaurant/café), Unit 5, West Business Park, Circular Road, Roscommon
- Akanchawa's Honey Pot (restaurant/café), 40 Mountjoy Street, Dublin 7
- Fernhill Golf & Country Club (Closed area: restaurant and associated kitchen facilities within the club), Fernhill, Carrigaline, Cork
- Hannons Oakwood Hotel (Closed area: Kitchen area and all food service), Athlone Road, Roscommon
- Get Fresh Catering (restaurant/canteen), Castlerea Community School, Castlerea, Roscommon

Four Closure Orders were served under the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010 on:

- Ashford Oriental (restaurant/café), Main Street, Ashford, Wicklow
- Hairy Neds Pub and Shop (Closed activity: Shop deli and all food preparation areas), Crosskeys, Cavan
- Big Bites Take Away, Castle Street, Roscommon
- Fitto Café (restaurant/café), 12/13 Catherine Street, Limerick

Two Improvement Orders were served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

- J2 Sushi & Bento (restaurant/canteen), 5 Market Square, Navan, Meath
- Asian and Arabic Food Market (grocery), 3 Parnell Street, Limerick

One Prohibition Order was served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

- Arcross Foods (cold store), Blackrock, Louth

Dr Pamela Byrne, the FSAI chief executive, said: "Enforcement Orders and most especially Closure Orders and Prohibition Orders are never served for minor food safety breaches. They are served on food businesses only when a serious risk to consumer health has been identified or where there are a number of ongoing breaches of food legislation and that largely tends to relate to a grave hygiene or operational issue. There can be no excuse for putting consumers’ health at risk through negligent practices. Food businesses have a legal onus to make sure that the food they sell or serve is safe to eat.”

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